In the closing moments of what became a nasty referendum campaign, perhaps the worst side of humanity was on show. Now, with a country divided amongst itself by regions, and by age groups, it is time to appeal not to the worst demons that have been unleashed, but rather, as Abraham Lincoln once said, to the better angels of our nature. It is time to seek a higher ground, and to come together for a common purpose where Britain can point the way to genuine liberty by a free trade and free market orientation with respect to its relationships with the rest of the world.”

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So what’s to be done? To those who voted for Brexit: how can we use this opportunity to carve out a role for Britain in the world that is appropriate for the world’s fifth biggest economy with a rich and storied history? To those who voted for Remain: how can we play the hand we have been dealt in a way that is best for the country and the world? While anger and pain are the emotions of the day for about half the country, we must not allow our emotional responses to defeat a pragmatic approach. For a country whose favourite motto is “keep calm and carry on”, pragmatic realism is required.”

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“An entrepreneurial nation looks at a crisis as an opportunity to look for what is not present in the world and ask why it is not there. An entrepreneurial nation is not afraid of chaos and uncertainty, because the reality is that certainty is and always has been an illusion. Of course, Britannia will be buffeted as it sets its course and unfurls its sails. But surely this is a resilient country that can create a future for itself and then follow the course until it gets there. We must remember that Britain has played a pivotal role in many of the great historical moments of the last several hundred years. The only danger we face is that the creativity, resilience and courage that won two world wars, ignited an industrial revolution, and made staggering and disproportionate contributions to science and the arts will desert us in our hour of need. There are no guarantees except the certainty of failure if we do nothing.”

Read: Brexit: Reaching for a Higher Vision