Now in its fourth year, the Charles Street Symposium is an annual forum and essay contest for the world’s leading young researchers. It aims to give younger people a voice, and to bring together the best and brightest young thinkers to address issues of relevance to public policy that are inadequately addressed and understood in existing research.

This year, the Symposium addressed the question 'how can we ensure that ageing societies are more prosperous societies?'.

The shortlisted candidates presented their ideas to a room full of guests and a judging panel, which included Jeremy Cliffe, Bagehot Columnist at The Economist; Julia Manning, founder and Chief Executive of 2020health; Rudi Westendorp, Professor of Old-Age Medicine at the University of Copenhagen; and Adam Winslow, Chief Executive Officer of AIG Life. Sir Martyn Lewis CBE, broadcaster, journalist and Chairman of the National Council for Voluntary Organisations, was also involved in the judging process.

After hearing from each of the shortlisted candidates, the judges agreed that Kyle Moore, undergraduate student at the National University of Northern Ireland, Galway, should be awarded the £3,000 AIG-Legatum Prize for his innovative concept of a reciprocal “caring credits” system across the EU, that allowed participants to earn credits through caring for the elderly (similar to the existing care credit scheme in Japan), which they could ‘cash in’ later in life, and in any EU member state, either to fund their own care or that of family members

Shortlisted Essays

Related​

  •  We Need to Talk About Ageing Societies, by Adam Winslow, Cover magazine, 1 April 2016 [View]
  • What About This Idea? Caring for Older People to Pay for Your Own Future Care, The Journal, April 2016 [View]
  • NUIG Student from Mayo Wins Prestigious AIG Legatum, Connaught Telegraph, April 2016 [View]
  • Press Release—Winner for 2015/16 AIG Legatum Prize Unveiled, 21 March 2016 [View]
  • Photos [View]
  • Britain's Ageing Population Could Be An Opportunity—Not Just a Disaster, by Stephen Clarke, City A.M. [View]

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